Social psychology research dating violence

A CDC Report found among victims of contact sexual violence, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, nearly 23% of females and 14% of males first experienced some form of violence by that partner before age 18. Unhealthy, abusive, or violent relationships can have short- and long-term negative effects on a developing teen.

Youth who experience dating violence are more likely to: Additionally, youth who are victims of dating violence in high school are at higher risk for victimization during college.

Dating violence can be prevented when teens, families, organizations, and communities work together to implement effective prevention strategies.

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However, these behaviors can become abusive and develop into more serious forms of violence.

Teen dating violence [187KB, 2Pages, 508] is defined as the physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional aggression within a dating relationship, including stalking.

Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime.

Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name-calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship.

For her study, Dorothy Espelage, professor of educational psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and her colleagues conducted a longitudinal study among 625 students starting in grades 5, 6, and 7, and followed them over a period of four years.

Last modified 05-Feb-2018 03:13